Pickle Real Estate

Reading Between the Head-Lines

The Nine Most “Inconvenient” RoboSigning Admissions BofA Would Love To Disappear

2010-11-15 ZeroHedge.com

As if the fact that the world economy has once again taken a turn for the worse (rising inflation in China, sinking everything in Europe, endless QE in the US) wasn’t enough, that pesky problem of robosigning and fraudclosure just refuses to go away. And even though the major banks are doing their best to remove any reference of this problem, which will eventually be the final nail in the coffin sealing the first truly global great depression, from the mainstream media, here is a sampling of some of the choicest admissions by robosigners, which will continue to serve as the basis for thousands of lawsuits (both RICO and otherwise) to come. While we know that BofA’s Reps & Warrantees reserve is woefully underfunded (with everyone and their grandmother now seeking to putback RMBS to BofA, anything less than ‘infinity’ is underfunded), we hope Bank of America has set up a sufficiently large legal expenses reserve. It will need it.

1. ‘Just Sign The Documents

Video deposition of alleged robosigner Crystal Moore of Nationwide Title Clearing. Deposition taken by attorney Christopher Forrest of The Forrest Law Firm in Pinellas County, Florida, Nov. 4, 2010

2. A Vice President At More Than 20 Companies

Part 2: Video deposition of alleged robosigner Bryan Bly taken by attorney Christopher Forrest in Pinellas County, FL on Nov. 4, 2010.

3. “Just Look For My Name, And Then Sign”

“Do you have any understanding as to what that term means, ‘for good and valuable consideration’?”
“I don’t usually read the docs when I sign.”
“So it’s not part of your job to review the document. Your job is just to sign it.”
“Just look for my name, and then sign.”

4. No Experience Necessary

“What did you study [in the one year of college]?”
“Nothin’. It was just the basic.”
“General courses?”
“Yeah.”
“Do you have any other additional training or education in banking or finance?”
“No.”
“Real estate?”
“No.”
“Law?”
“No.”

 

 

5. Signing 5,000 Documents Per Day At Less Than A Minute Each

“Can you tell me on any given day how many assignments or other documents you sign?”
“Are you looking for a ballpark average?”
“Ballpark. I certainly don’t expect you to remember exactly.”
“I’d say 5,000.”
“Would that be an average day for you?”
“That would be average.”
“Would it be fair to say that during your tenure at NTC you’ve probably signed an excess of 50 or 60 thousand documents?”
“Yes.”
“Could be higher than that?”
“Yes.”
“With signing so many on any given day, can you estimate for me the amount of time you spend on any given document?”
“Less than a minute.”
“When you’re presented with a document to sign or notarize, do you take any steps to verify any of the information contained in the document?”
“Not in the body.”
“When you say ‘not in the body’ are there any other steps that you take?”
“I’m just looking to make sure it’s been fully signed.”
“Would it be accurate to say that you are presented with a stack of documents to sign, and your practice is to look at the document, see if it’s been signed, affix your signature to it and then move on to the next document?”
“Correct.”

 

 

6. A Disturbing Lack Of Experience

“When you say ‘financial’ are you referring to matters relating to banking?”
“No. We don’t do mortgages in my country. … I don’t have any idea about mortgages when I started here.”

 

 

7. A Strange Definition Of A Mortgage

“Did you take any steps to verify any of the information contained in this assignment before you signed it?”
“No.”
“Do you ever take any steps to verify any of the information in the documents you sign at NTC?”
“No.”

[...]

“What is your understanding of what exactly is a mortgage?”
“When somebody goes to buy a house, they take a loan. And then the mortgage is their paying the banks bank.”
“Can you tell me what your understanding is of the term ‘promissory note’?”
“That’s just the note. Like it says the interest rate and stuff like that on it.”

 

 

8. Management May Have Electronically Signed Documents For One Employee

“Do you play any role in the creation of the documents to which your signature is electronically affixed?”
“No role.”
“Do you have any idea what documents or how many documents your signature has been electronically affixed to?”
“No.”
“Do you ever review those electronic documents after your signature has been affixed?”
“No.”
“So would it be accurate to say that entire process takes place outside of your presence and knowledge?”
“That would be fair.”

[...]

“You play no role in the determination as to whether or not you should be signing the document physically, or whether your electronic signature should be inserted?”
“No.”
“Who makes that decision?”
“That would be someone in management.”
“So someone else in management is making a decision as to whether or not to use your signature to affix it electronically to a document?”
“Yes.”
“And you have no role in that process?”
“Correct.”

 

 

9. Signing More Than 50,000 Documents

“Have you signed assignments or other documents as vice president of any other companies?”
“Yes.”
“What companies have you signed as vice president?”
“I don’t know.”
“You can’t recall any?”
“Mm-mm [No].”
“Can you estimate for me the number of different companies that you’ve signed assignments as vice president?”
“I don’t know.”
“Can you estimate for me how many assignments or other documents in total during your tenure at NTC you signed as an officer or a vice president of a company?”
“I don’t know.”
“Is it more than 10?”
“Yes.”
“More than 500?”
“Yes.”
“More than 5,000?”
“Yes.”
“More than 20,000?”
“Yes.”
“More than 50,000?”
“And out of those 50,000, the only company that you can recall signing as a vice president or an officer is City Residential Lending?”
“Yes.

 

All Videos Here:

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November 15, 2010 - Posted by | Banking, Foreclosure, Investments, Lending, Real Estate, Stats

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